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Flood Mitigation..colorado flooding

Mitigation defined is: It includes any activities that prevent an emergency, reduce the chance of an emergency happening, or lessen the damaging effects of unavoidable emergencies. Investing in mitigation steps now such as constructing barriers such as levees and purchasing flood insurance will help reduce the amount of structural damage to your home and financial loss from building and crop damage should a flood or flash flood occur.

The aim on planning the mitigation against flood is to reduce human suffering caused by flood and increase the sense of security of flood victims. Mitigation against flood can be measured through several alternatives for instance constructing flood proof houses, planting, government planning, etc. But there are other non-technical issues that should be considered on flood mitigation. First, community habits especially waste disposal. Many communities are not aware of this issue and for instance dispose tons of waste in nearby rivers. Second, identify the vulnerable people. Third, identify the most important things to carry during a flood. Fourth is the community knowledge on flood orientation, including safe areas, etc.

Flood Mitigation..colorado flooding

Mitigation defined is: It includes any activities that prevent an emergency, reduce the chance of an emergency happening, or lessen the damaging effects of unavoidable emergencies. Investing in mitigation steps now such as constructing barriers such as levees and purchasing flood insurance will help reduce the amount of structural damage to your home and financial loss from building and crop damage should a flood or flash flood occur.

The aim on planning the mitigation against flood is to reduce human suffering caused by flood and increase the sense of security of flood victims. Mitigation against flood can be measured through several alternatives for instance constructing flood proof houses, planting, government planning, etc. But there are other non-technical issues that should be considered on flood mitigation. First, community habits especially waste disposal. Many communities are not aware of this issue and for instance dispose tons of waste in nearby rivers. Second, identify the vulnerable people. Third, identify the most important things to carry during a flood. Fourth is the community knowledge on flood orientation, including safe areas, etc.

Flood Preparedness.

Flood Preparedness.

  • Find out if you live in a flood-prone area and whether your property is above or below the flood stage water level. Also learn about the history of flooding for your region. Learn flood warning signs and your community alert signals.
  • If you live in a frequently flooded area, stockpile emergency building materials. These include plywood, plastic sheeting, lumber nails, hammer and saw, pry bar, shovels, and sandbags. Have check valves installed building sewer traps to prevent flood waters from backing up in sewer drains. Finally, use large corks or stoppers to plug showers, tubs, or basins. Plan and practice an evacuation route.
  • Your family emergency plan should take into consideration planning for floods because everyone is at risk. All 50 states experiences floods.
  • Your evacuation routes should contain alternate routes to higher ground.
  • Have an Emergency Communication Plan
  • Plan and practice a flood evacuation route with your family. Ask an out-of-state relative or friend to be the "family contact" in case your family is separated during a flood. Make sure everyone in your family knows the name, address, and phone number of this contact person.
  • Make a plan for family in case separate each other, to make a contact and meeting point when separate.
  • Stay informed on current situation.
  • Inform local authorities about any special needs, i.e., elderly or bedridden people, or anyone with a disability.
  • Buy and install sump pumps with back-up power.
  • Have a licensed electrician raise electric components (switches, sockets, circuit breakers and wiring) at least 12" above your home's projected flood elevation.
  • For drains, toilets, and other sewer connections, install backflow valves or plugs to prevent floodwaters from entering.
  • Anchor fuel tanks which can contaminate your basement if torn free. An unanchored tank outside can be swept downstream and damage other houses.
  • Take photographs or videos of all your important possessions. If a flood damages your home, these items will help you file your flood insurance claim.
  • Store important documents and irreplaceable personal objects where they won’t be damaged. If a major flood is expected, consider putting these items in storage facility.
  • Inform local authorities about any special needs, i.e., elderly or bedridden people, or anyone with a disability.
  • Identify potential home hazards and know how to secure or protect them before the flood strikes. Be prepared to turn off electrical power when there is standing water, fallen power lines, or before you evacuation. Turn off gas and water supplies before you evacuate. Secure structurally unstable building materials.
  • Buy a fire extinguisher and make sure your family knows where it is and how to use it.

Emergency Supplies You Will Need .

Emergency Supplies You Will Need .

You should stock your home with supplies that may be needed during the emergency period. At a minimum, these supplies should include:

  • Several clean containers for water, large enough for a 3-5 day supply of water (about five gallons for each person).
  • A 3-5 day supply of non-perishable food and a non-electric can opener.
  • A first aid kit and manual and prescription medicines and special medical needs.
  • A battery-powered radio, flashlights, and extra batteries.
  • Sleeping bags or extra blankets.
  • Water-purifying supplies, such as chlorine or iodine tablets or unscented, ordinary household chlorine bleach.
  • Baby food and/or prepared formula, diapers, and other baby supplies.
  • Disposable cleaning cloths, such as "baby wipes" for the whole family to use in case bathing facilities are not available.
  • Personal hygiene supplies, such as soap, toothpaste, sanitary napkins, etc.
  • An emergency kit for your car with food, flares, booster cables, maps, tools, a first aid kit, fire extinguisher, sleeping bags, etc.
  • Rubber boots, sturdy shoes, and waterproof gloves.
  • Insect repellent containing DEET or Picaridin, screens, or long-sleeved and long-legged clothing for protection from mosquitoes which may gather in pooled water remaining after the flood.

What to Tell Children.

What to Tell Children.

  • If you come upon flood waters, stop, turn around, and go another way. Climb to higher ground. If it is moving swiftly, even water six inches deep can knock you off your feet. Many people are swept away wading through flood waters, resulting in injury or death.
  • Stay away from flooded areas. Even if it seems safe, flood waters may still be rising.
  • Never try to walk, swim, drive, or play in flood water. You may not be able to see on the surface how fast flood water is moving or see holes and submerged debris.
  • If you are in a vehicle and become surrounded by water, if you can get out safely, do so immediately and move to higher ground. Vehicles can be swept away in two feet of water.
  • Watch out for snakes in areas that were flooded. Flood waters flush snakes from their homes.
  • Stay away from creek and stream banks in flooded and recently flooded areas. The soaked banks often become unstable due to heavy rainfall and can suddenly give way, tossing you into rapidly moving water.
  • Never play around high water, storm drains, ditches, ravines, or culverts. It is very easy to be swept away by fast moving water.
  • Throw away all food that has come into contact with flood waters. Contaminated flood water contains bacteria and germs. Eating foods exposed to flood waters can make you very sick.

How to Protect Your Property.

How to Protect Your Property.

  • Keep insurance policies, documents, and other valuables in a safe-deposit box. You may need quick, easy access to these documents. Keep them in a safe place less likely to be damaged during a flood.
  • Avoid building in a floodplain unless you elevate and reinforce your home. Some communities do not permit building in known floodplains. If there are no restrictions, and you are building in a floodplain, take precautions, making it less likely your home will be damaged during a flood.
  • Raise your furnace, water heater, and electric panel to higher floors or the attic if they are in areas of your home that may be flooded. Raising this equipment will prevent damage.
  • An undamaged water heater may be your best source of fresh water after a flood.
  • Install check valves in building sewer traps to prevent flood water from backing up into the drains of your home. As a last resort, when floods threaten, use large corks or stoppers to plug showers, tubs, or basins.
  • Construct barriers such as levees, berms, and flood walls to stop flood water from entering the building. Permission to construct such barriers may be required by local building codes. Check local building codes and ordinances for safety requirements.
  • Seal walls in basements with waterproofing compounds to avoid seepage through cracks.
  • Consult with a construction professional for further information if these and other damage reduction measures can be taken.