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During Winter Storms, most people stay inside. That is where some of the dangers begin. 

Light and Cook Safely

If there is a power failure:

• Use battery-powered flashlights or lanterns rather than candles, if possible.

• Never leave lit candles unattended.

• Never use a charcoal or gas grill indoors— the fumes are deadly.

Never use an electric generator indoors, inside the garage, or near the air intake of your house because of the risk of carbon monoxide poisoning:

• Plug in appliances to the generator using individual heavy-duty, outdoor-rated cords.

• Do not use the generator or appliances if they are wet because of the risk of electrocution.

• Do not store gasoline indoors where the fumes could ignite.

 

Conserve Heat

You may need fresh air coming in for your heater or for emergency cooking arrangements. However, if you don’t need extra ventilation, keep as much heat as possible inside your home. Avoid unnecessary opening of doors or windows.

Close off unneeded rooms, stuff towels or rags in cracks under doors, and close draperies or cover windows with blankets at night.

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cold weather

Winter storms Hazards

These are weather hazards associated with freezing or frozen precipitation (freezing rain, sleet, snow) or combined effects of winter precipitation and strong winds.

 

BLOWING SNOW

Wind-driven snow that reduces visibility. Blowing snow may be falling snow and/or snow on the ground picked up by the wind.

SNOW SQUALLS

Brief, intense snow showers accompanied by strong, gusty winds. Accumulation may be significant.

SNOW SHOWERS

Snow falling at varying intensities for brief periods of time. Some accumulation is possible.

 

SNOW FLURRIES

Light snow falling for short durations with little or no accumulation.

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Portable Generators

Portable generators are useful when temporary or remote electric power is needed, but they also can be hazardous. The primary hazards to avoid when using a generator are carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning from the toxic engine exhaust, electric shock or electrocution, and fire. Every year, people die in incidents related to portable generator use.

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If you plan to use a wood stove, fireplace, or space heater, be extremely careful. Follow the manufacturer’s instructions, and remember these safety tips:

• Use fireplace, wood stoves, or other combustion heaters only if they are properly vented to the outside and do not leak flue gas into the indoor air space.

• Do not burn paper in a fireplace.

• Ensure adequate ventilation if you must use a kerosene heater.

• Use only the type of fuel your heater is designed to use— don’t substitute.

• Do not place a space heater within 3 feet of anything that may catch on fire, such as drapes, furniture, or bedding, and never cover your space heater.

• Never place a space heater on top of furniture or near water.

• Never leave children unattended near a space heater.

• Make sure that the cord of an electric space heater is not a tripping hazard but do not run the cord under carpets or rugs.

• Avoid using extension cords to plug in your space heater.

• If your space heater has a damaged electrical cord or produces sparks, do not use it.

• Store a multipurpose, dry-chemical fire extinguisher near the area to be heated.

• Protect yourself from carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning by installing a battery-operated CO detector and never using generators, grills, camp stoves, or similar devices indoors.

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CO2 Sign

Prevent Carbon Monoxide Poisoning.

Carbon monoxide (CO) is an odorless, colorless gas that can cause sudden illness and death if inhaled. When power outages occur during emergencies such as winter storms, the use of alternative sources of fuel or electricity for heating or cooking can cause CO to build up in a home, garage, or camper and to poison the people and animals inside.